Forum

It can be difficult to take a stand in the controversy surrounding an institution’s obligation to provide birth control as part of the health insurance they offer. One’s religious conviction may convince that person to side with the organization, as a founding principle of the United States is to not infringe upon a person’s religious rights. It should be considered however that the choice of whether to provide birth control does not affect the owners of the organization, but rather the employees. Regardless of faith or , no employee should have religious beliefs forced on them.
It should first be addressed, that the general public does not have a full knowledge of the ongoing controversy. Some people are supporting the organizations which are attempting to enforce these policies, strictly to support religious rights. Hobby Lobby does not have a clear defined reason for their decision. It is not necessary for them to provide said reason either, as they can simply claim it is a religious right. At what point do religious rights become too much? Will Hobby Lobby also be allowed to force employees to attend church services and enforce hebraic laws? Hobby Lobby claims that the birth control they want to deny to employees causes abortions. Medical science disproves their opinion. “The morning-after pill works by preventing ovulation or fertilization” (Talley, 2012). Intrauterine devices prevent the embryo from ever even implanting in a woman’s uterus. Hobby Lobby’s irrational reasoning is creating a major setback for women’s rights. They are essentially trying to control the bodies of their female employees. “five men in black robes decided that we should return to policies of the 1950s and ask our bosses’ permission to receive basic preventive health care” (Lauper, 2015). If this is allowed, it will allow for further discrimination. “ the decision is a blow to women’s rights and puts the country on a perilous path toward institutionalized discrimination”…