Dementia

Dementia refers to a loss of thinking abilities, often memory problems. It most likely occurs in elderly people and is more frequent in those over 85 of age. Dementia is caused by disease that damages or destroys the brain tissue which causes the brain to stop functioning correctly. There are many diseases that dementia may be caused by such as, Alzheimer’s disease, alcoholism, head injury, Parkinson’s disease and sometimes strokes.
Alzheimer’s disease causes dementia due to the gradual death of the brain tissue. Strokes occur when a blood vessel in the brain, is blocked or leaking which results in the brain not receiving oxygen. Often when parts of the brain do not receive oxygen they are either permanently damaged or end up dying. Strokes can cause loss of thinking abilities and sensations. Usually when an older person appears to have major changes in memory or thinking a medical evaluation is helpful. This determines if the problem is temporary or something more serious.
Many people with dementia experience emotional distress or behavioral changes. This is called agitation which can sometimes may seem like a personality change in a way a person acts or gets along with others. Some symptoms of agitation include: constant demands, repetitive questions or demands, “Blow ups”, excessive anger, refusal to do anything, cursing, threats, and constant pacing or searching. Agitation is caused by the physical changes in the brain and no longer has the ability to function healthy.
There are four problems that cause agitation such as environmental stress, sleep problems, psychiatric syndromes, or physical and medical problems. Physical and medical problems can weaken the brain and make one seem more agitated. A term delirium is used to describe episodes of confusion that begin with a medical illness. There are several illnesses that cause temporary memory loss such as bladder infections, colds, bronchitis, or dehydration. A reaction to some medicines can also…